Advances in Economics, Management and Political Sciences

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Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Business and Policy Studies

Series Vol. 13 , 13 September 2023


Open Access | Article

Behavioral Economics: The Decoy Effect

Hongyang Sun * 1
1 Western University

* Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.

Advances in Economics, Management and Political Sciences, Vol. 13, 46-51
Published 13 September 2023. © 2023 The Author(s). Published by EWA Publishing
This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Citation Hongyang Sun. Behavioral Economics: The Decoy Effect. AEMPS (2023) Vol. 13: 46-51. DOI: 10.54254/2754-1169/13/20230670.

Abstract

Behavioral economics blends psychology and economics to determine how psychological triggers or nudges influence people's decision-making. The decoy effect has been a particular focus of study in the behavioral economics literature. The decoy effect is seen as an effective "Nudge" and is widely used by businesses. For example, magazine subscriptions, vacation destination choices, and sales of various products—where there is a choice, there is an arena for nudges. The marketplace is flooded with nudges to influence consumer choice; in everyday consumption, many businesses use the decoy effect to maximize sales of specific products or options to increase revenue. Based on a review of the relevant literature and practical case applications of the decoy effect, this study summarizes articles with similar conclusions which can support each other while also mentioning different views regarding the limitations and disagreements of the decoy effect in behavioral economics. However, in general, the effects carried by decoys are apparent and have been confirmed by a large amount of literature.

Keywords

decoy effect, attraction effect, asymmetrically dominated, market strategy, behavioral economics

References

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Data Availability

The datasets used and/or analyzed during the current study will be available from the authors upon reasonable request.

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Volume Title
Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Business and Policy Studies
ISBN (Print)
978-1-915371-69-0
ISBN (Online)
978-1-915371-70-6
Published Date
13 September 2023
Series
Advances in Economics, Management and Political Sciences
ISSN (Print)
2754-1169
ISSN (Online)
2754-1177
DOI
10.54254/2754-1169/13/20230670
Copyright
© 2023 The Author(s)
Open Access
This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited

Copyright © 2023 EWA Publishing. Unless Otherwise Stated