Advances in Economics, Management and Political Sciences

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Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Financial Technology and Business Analysis

Series Vol. 97 , 02 July 2024


Open Access | Article

Research on Sweatshops from the Perspective of Corporate Social Responsibility

Yiming Sun * 1
1 High School Attached to Northeast Normal University, Changchun 130000, China

* Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.

Advances in Economics, Management and Political Sciences, Vol. 97, 49-54
Published 02 July 2024. © 02 July 2024 The Author(s). Published by EWA Publishing
This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Citation Yiming Sun. Research on Sweatshops from the Perspective of Corporate Social Responsibility. AEMPS (2024) Vol. 97: 49-54. DOI: 10.54254/2754-1169/97/20231634.

Abstract

Economic globalization brings opportunities as well as challenges to business and labour, and labour rights violations related to sweatshops are one of them. With the human rights movement, more and more social organisations are joining the anti-sweatshop movement. In this context, governments have also been deemed to need to collaborate and take action to ban the sale of products manufactured under sweatshop conditions. This essay will address the anti-sweatshop movement from the perspectives of sustainable supply chains and corporate social responsibility. After analysing the reasons that influence the formation of sweatshops and the importance of the need to eradicate them, the essay will argue that by doing so various governments can effectively promote awareness amongst businesses of their need to adhere to corporate codes of conduct and fulfil corporate social responsibility, and as a result these corporations will have the potential to safeguard labour rights and promote their own sustainable development and social justice.

Keywords

Sustainable development, Social justice, Anti-sweatshop movement

References

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Data Availability

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Volume Title
Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Financial Technology and Business Analysis
ISBN (Print)
978-1-83558-505-4
ISBN (Online)
978-1-83558-506-1
Published Date
02 July 2024
Series
Advances in Economics, Management and Political Sciences
ISSN (Print)
2754-1169
ISSN (Online)
2754-1177
DOI
10.54254/2754-1169/97/20231634
Copyright
02 July 2024
Open Access
This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited

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